U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION: Marian L. Zobler Named NRC General Counsel

Source: U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued the following announcement on Aug. 2.

Marian L. Zobler, the agency’s Deputy General Counsel for Rulemaking and Policy Support, has been selected by the Commission as the agency’s next General Counsel. Zobler has been serving as Acting General Counsel since Margaret M. Doane was appointed NRC’s Executive Director for Operations last month. The appointment is effective Aug. 5.


Zobler joined the NRC in 1990 as part of the Office of the General Counsel’s Honor Law Graduate Program. Since then, she has served in a variety of progressively more responsible positions within OGC, including Assistant General Counsel for the High-Level Waste Repository Program and Assistant General Counsel for New Reactor Programs. She also served as legal assistant to former Chairman Richard Meserve, and as Acting Deputy Director for the Office of Federal and State Materials and Environmental Management Programs.


As General Counsel, Zobler will oversee the Office of General Counsel and direct matters of law and legal policy; provide legal opinions, advice, and assistance to the agency; monitor adjudicatory proceedings;provide legal interpretations; and represent and protect the interests of the NRC in legal matters.


“Marian’s knowledge, leadership and dedication to public service have long impressed those of us who have had the privilege of working closely with her,” said NRC Chairman Kristine Svinicki. “I am confident she will step smoothly into her new role as General Counsel and lead the highly talented OGC staff to continued success.”


Zobler earned a bachelor’s degree from Barnard College and a law degree from Brooklyn Law School. She is a graduate of the NRC SES Candidate Development Program.

Original source can be found here.

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U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

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