NEESC releases 2015 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Development Plans

NEESC releases 2015 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Development Plans
NEESC releases 2015 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Development Plans | Courtesy of neesc.org

Leaders from the Northeast Electrochemical Energy Storage Cluster recently announced its 2015 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Development Plans that affect eight northeastern states.

By replacing older facilities, experts expect electricity-generation capacity to rise. They also say using fuel cell technology as a method to meet the high demands of the electric grid will allow them to locate generation assets directly at a consumer’s site, improving the efficiency and reliability of delivering electricity while decreasing emissions from hospitals, schools, manufacturing plants and similar commercial facilities.

"These plans should be very helpful for policymakers to better understand the potential market for fuel cell technology," marketing leader of GE Fuel Cells John McGuinness said.

Upholding U.S. Small Business Administration standards, the plans were individually designed for New Hampshire, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Maine, Vermont, Rhode Island and New York based on input from government agencies, automakers, gas suppliers, and hydrogen and fuel cell companies. Implementing the plans will make it more feasible for states to meet the carbon dioxide emissions and zero emission vehicles reductions and requirements and will enable regions to use valuable resources including wind, biomass and photovoltaic power. 

"States that support the development of clean, efficient technologies such as fuel cells have realized the benefits, including increased energy reliability with low or zero emissions,"  Fuel Cell Hydrogen and Energy Association President Morry Markowitz said.

Leaders from the Northeast Electrochemical Energy Storage Cluster recently announced its 2015 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Development Plans that affect eight northeastern states.

By replacing older facilities, experts expect electricity-generation capacity to rise. They also say using fuel cell technology as a method to meet the high demands of the electric grid will allow them to locate generation assets directly at a consumer’s site, improving the efficiency and reliability of delivering electricity while decreasing emissions from hospitals, schools, manufacturing plants and similar commercial facilities.

"These plans should be very helpful for policymakers to better understand the potential market for fuel cell technology," marketing leader of GE Fuel Cells John McGuinness said.

Upholding U.S. Small Business Administration standards, the plans were individually designed for New Hampshire, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Maine, Vermont, Rhode Island and New York based on input from government agencies, automakers, gas suppliers, and hydrogen and fuel cell companies. Implementing the plans will make it more feasible for states to meet the carbon dioxide emissions and zero emission vehicles reductions and requirements and will enable regions to use valuable resources including wind, biomass and photovoltaic power. 

"States that support the development of clean, efficient technologies such as fuel cells have realized the benefits, including increased energy reliability with low or zero emissions,"  Fuel Cell Hydrogen and Energy Association President Morry Markowitz said.