NEI scrutinizing Clean Power Plan

The Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) said it is still reviewing the newly introduced Clean Power Plan, which lays out regulations from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on carbon emissions from electrical power plants.

“In the days ahead, the Nuclear Energy Institute will more closely evaluate the final Clean Power Plan rule to determine how EPA has treated nuclear energy facilities as part of its plan to transition to a lower carbon electric sector,"  Marvin Fertel, president and CEO of the NEI, said. "Based on our preliminary review, the final rule appears to require larger carbon reductions than the proposed rule, and places a greater emphasis on mass-based compliance approaches. Those two factors alone should drive increased recognition of the value of existing nuclear power plants."

Yet, Fertel said an initial review of the plan found that it fails to incorporate the carbon abatement value of existing facilities.

“In the final rule, EPA notes correctly that ‘existing nuclear generation helps make existing CO2 emissions lower than they would otherwise be, but will not further lower CO2 emissions below current levels,’" Fertel said. "What the final rule fails to recognize is that CO2 emissions will be significantly higher if existing nuclear power plants shut down prematurely."

Approximately 50 percent of states already utilize nuclear power as their largest source of renewable or carbon-free power generation, Fertel said.

"Without nuclear energy, the Clean Power Plan’s carbon reduction goals will be difficult, if not impossible, to achieve and sustain," Fertel said.

The Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) said it is still reviewing the newly introduced Clean Power Plan, which lays out regulations from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on carbon emissions from electrical power plants.

“In the days ahead, the Nuclear Energy Institute will more closely evaluate the final Clean Power Plan rule to determine how EPA has treated nuclear energy facilities as part of its plan to transition to a lower carbon electric sector,"  Marvin Fertel, president and CEO of the NEI, said. "Based on our preliminary review, the final rule appears to require larger carbon reductions than the proposed rule, and places a greater emphasis on mass-based compliance approaches. Those two factors alone should drive increased recognition of the value of existing nuclear power plants."

Yet, Fertel said an initial review of the plan found that it fails to incorporate the carbon abatement value of existing facilities.

“In the final rule, EPA notes correctly that ‘existing nuclear generation helps make existing CO2 emissions lower than they would otherwise be, but will not further lower CO2 emissions below current levels,’" Fertel said. "What the final rule fails to recognize is that CO2 emissions will be significantly higher if existing nuclear power plants shut down prematurely."

Approximately 50 percent of states already utilize nuclear power as their largest source of renewable or carbon-free power generation, Fertel said.

"Without nuclear energy, the Clean Power Plan’s carbon reduction goals will be difficult, if not impossible, to achieve and sustain," Fertel said.

Organizations in this story

Nuclear Energy Institute 1201 F St NW D.C., DC - 20004

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 1200 Pennsylvania Ave NW Washington, DC - 20460

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