GSE Systems reps talk simulation technologies

Using simulation technologies to help teach nuclear workers how to respond in the event of an accident was the subject of recent presentations by two representatives of GSE Systems, Inc. 

Attendees at the European Commission Joint Research Centre's workshop in the Netherlands on March 3  heard GSE Senior Vice President Gil Grady talk about the way severe accident simulation is being used by the nuclear industry.

"We all recognize the need for better training for beyond design-basis events," Grady said. "An interactive simulation tool based upon industry-recognized severe accident models provides both a realistic, cost-effective training environment as well as a tool to test the effectiveness of severe accident mitigation guidelines."

Clay Lietwiler, engineering supervisor at GSE, also spoke at the Electric Power Research Institute’s Modular Accident Analysis Program (MAAP) Users Group conference on March 17-19 in Paris. The title of his talk was "Use of MAAP in a Full-Scope or Engineering Simulator."

He spoke about how combining the institute's MAAP code with real-time simulation can predict the way nuclear plant employees will act in a given situation. It also gives plant operators the chance to test different types of accidents and practice properly managing them.
Using simulation technologies to help teach nuclear workers how to respond in the event of an accident was the subject of recent presentations by two representatives of GSE Systems, Inc. 

Attendees at the European Commission Joint Research Centre's workshop in the Netherlands on March 3  heard GSE Senior Vice President Gil Grady talk about the way severe accident simulation is being used by the nuclear industry.

"We all recognize the need for better training for beyond design-basis events," Grady said. "An interactive simulation tool based upon industry-recognized severe accident models provides both a realistic, cost-effective training environment as well as a tool to test the effectiveness of severe accident mitigation guidelines."

Clay Lietwiler, engineering supervisor at GSE, also spoke at the Electric Power Research Institute’s Modular Accident Analysis Program (MAAP) Users Group conference on March 17-19 in Paris. The title of his talk was "Use of MAAP in a Full-Scope or Engineering Simulator."

He spoke about how combining the institute's MAAP code with real-time simulation can predict the way nuclear plant employees will act in a given situation. It also gives plant operators the chance to test different types of accidents and practice properly managing them.